Archive for 2013

Thousands left without power across US and Canada

<p>LITCHFIELD, Maine (AP) - Utility crews from Maine to Michigan and into Canada worked Wednesday to restore power to the more than half a million homes in the U.S. and Canada that were left in the dark by last weekend's ice storm and people slowly trickled out of shelters to spend Christmas Day at their finally-warm homes.

But not everyone was so lucky, including Ashley Walter, who was forced to spend Christmas at a shelter set up in a school in Litchfield, Maine, with her husband, Jacob, and their month-old daughter, Leah.

The family lost power Saturday, got it back temporarily then lost it again Sunday and have been without since. Ashley, 27, and Leah stay warm at the shelter while Jacob makes frequent trips home to check on their cats and water pipes.

"It's definitely kind of strange but we're hanging in there," she said Wednesday of the challenge of being forced out of their home at Christmas. "We did our Christmas together last night. I packed little stockings and gave them to my husband, sisters and my daughter."

The frigid temperatures that cloaked a region from the Great Lakes to New England meant that ice remained on power lines and limbs. Officials worried that wind gusts of more than 20 mph could bring down more branches and that 2 to 6 inches of snow in places on Thursday would hamper line crews trying to get to remote spots.

"We've had two beautiful, sunny days in Maine and the ice isn't going anyplace," said Lynette Miller, spokeswoman for the Maine Emergency Management Agency. "They're very concerned about more weight coming down on trees that are already compromised by ice."

The ice storm last weekend was one of the worst to hit during a Christmas week and repair crews were working around the clock to restore service. States that weren't hit were sending crews to help.

So far, authorities blame the storm for 27 deaths; 17 in the U.S. and 10 in Canada. Five people in Canada died from carbon monoxide poisoning from emergency generators powering their homes, while two people in Michigan, a man in Maine and a man in Vermont also died from the poisonous fumes.

In Michigan, police say a 73-year-old woman died Christmas Eve when she ran a stop light that was out of service because of the ice storm.

About 156,000 homes were still without power Wednesday evening in Michigan, down from more than 500,000 at the storm's peak.

In Canada, about 160,000 customers were without power Wednesday evening. There were 72,000 customers without power in Toronto, down from 300,000 at the height of the outages, and Mayor Rob Ford said some may not have power restored until the weekend.

Back in Maine, Trudy Lamoreau was supervising the emergency shelter where about 25 people stayed Tuesday night. Lamoreau, who's also the town manager, said they warmed the shelter with generators until the school got power back late Tuesday night. Maine still had about 60,000 people without power, down from a high of 106,000.

"People are doing quite well considering the circumstances," she said.

Volunteers tried to make the shelter homey, including cooking up a ham dinner with potatoes, vegetables, bread and pie for dessert for Christmas.

"They have been amazing," Walter said, adding that the volunteers set up a separate room for her and Leah so they wouldn't disturb others when the infant woke during the night. "They just try to make everything better for us."

___

Associated Press writers David Goodman in Detroit and Rik Stevens in Concord, N.H., contributed to this report.

Wednesday, December 25, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Keep the cursive in Christmas!

As soon as the last plate of Thanksgiving turkey was cleared from the table it seemed the holiday cards began to arrive in my mailbox. Call me a dinosaur, but I still love writing and receiving Christmas cards- and I am not talking about the electronic kind. Besides looking at the beautiful pictures and sparkly scenes on the cards, I thoroughly enjoy reading the little notes and greetings that my friends and family write inside. I often find myself admiring, in addition to their words, the writers' beautiful or unique cursive handwriting.

I've been a fan of the art of cursive handwriting for as long as I can remember. I guess the seed was planted back in Catholic grade school when "Handwriting" was taught as an actual subject and we received a grade for it on our report cards. I was never an excellent handwriter (my grades were usually somewhere in the 80s), but I would aspire to have handwriting like some of the others in my class who garnered 90s in handwriting on their report cards or even won the coveted "Penmanship Award" at the end of the school year (dare to dream!). In my sharp crazy memory, I can still remember who those stellar handwriters were.

Every September when we would get our new text books for the year, we would receive a brand new Penmanship book. Along with that, we would have to purchase a "Palmer Method" pen. The pen, which came in yellow, red, black or blue, had a large bump around its center where students would learn to hold their fingers, strategically placed, to produce beautiful writing. In the books, we students would trace different letters and then connect them before writing the same words ourselves freestyle on empty lines below. If we "didn't get it," and still wrote the words sloppily, we might have to take out a sheet of loose leaf paper and write a whole page or two of the words or letters we had trouble mastering that night for homework. I remember having trouble with the letters z, k and f and capitals Q and X. But I practiced to score those 80s!

Fast forward some years and I remember sitting with my own children, helping them master the same handwriting skills and praising them when they took extra care to write their homework assignments neatly. I remember they felt so "grown up" to finally be in a grade that required them to write like their parents and older siblings or cousins instead of printing like those in the younger grades do. So, keeping all this in mind, it would come as no surprise to find out how devastated I was when over 40 states decided not that long ago to drop teaching cursive writing from the required core curriculum and replace it with keyboarding. According to my understanding, it is now the individual school districts that decide if they do or don't want to teach cursive handwriting. In other words, teaching cursive handwriting has become an option.

I understand that computers are taking over everything and we can sign banking, real estate and all legal papers electronically these days. But what about when we scribble a signed absence or lateness note to our child's teacher? Sign a permission slip for a Scout's field trip? Sit in a doctor's office signing our life away before getting treatment? We have to do all of this on our computers in the future?

If children do not learn to write and read cursive handwriting, how will they read the original documents on which our country was founded (not a printed version) or any primary historical sources or diaries in museums or historical sites? What about a simple letter from grandmom or an uncle in the service? What if a computer goes down while important papers are being signed? Or will mail carriers of the future be required to learn Handwriting as a second language?

Getting taught handwriting is a discipline, a skill we keep for a lifetime. Some may say learning to recite poetry or mastering algebra or calculus problems won't actually be useful in the course of life, but all together, these things orchestrate a good, solid education. Once a student has these skills in their bag of tricks, their foundation, they can blossom in many other ways educationally and later, professionally. In addition to teaching eye-hand coordination, mastering handwriting shows refinement and the ability to communicate successfully in a global world with or without a computer keyboard. Of course mastering keyboarding is essential and a necessary skill, but why can't children be taught both, as they have been in the last ten years or more? If it isn't broke, why fix it?

Last week I covered a Christmas party that the Knights of Columbus hosted for Religious Sisters in the Philadelphia Archdiocese. After snapping some photos, I was going to get the names of the photo subjects, but the music was playing and it was noisy. Afraid I wouldn't hear well and misspell names, I passed my notepad and pen around and let the Sisters write their own names. When I was back at the office, writing my photo captions, one of the things I was struck by, was how lovely each and every one of the Sisters' handwriting was. I didn't have to wonder if a letter was an "o" or an "a" or a "v" or a "u." Their writing was Palmer Method Perfect.

"No wonder," I thought. "The Sisters are the ones who taught so many of us how to write clearly and neatly." A dying art? I don't think so. I like to think of it as the hallmark of a civilized, educated society. Although just about everything we do is generated through our computers, I do believe there's still a time and place for cursive. Call me old fashioned, but I believe we can still have the best of both worlds.

I know resources are tight and all kinds of programs, even art and music, are being cut from core curriculums in schools to meet budgets. I realize students use iPads and laptops instead of pens and notebooks. I try to stay with the times so I get all that. But I also get those 123 christmas cards, some that even have letters enclosed, in the mail. I can't help but think how intimate and personal they are when they have handwritten notes in them and how much I would miss that human touch if they were merely churned out by a computer printer. Continued...

I can visualize my brothers' and sisters' handwriting with closed eyes, as well as my husband's my children's, my parents', my friends' and even some of my co-workers'. As you know from people's signatures, our cursive handwriting is our own, unique to only us. I would hate to think that in one holiday season in the future that all of my cards will be waiting to be opened in e-mails on my computer instead of delivered to the mailbox on my front porch.

When I thought about this subject a week or so ago, I quickly polled by Facebook friends to hear their thoughts. Maybe we are all dinosaurs, but like me, not one person thought cutting cursive from core curriculum had any merit. Everyone agreed that children should still be taught cursive handwriting.

If we allow computer generated cards to replace the handwritten oldie but goodie snail-mail type, who knows, in years to come if we may have to enjoy a virtual Christmas tree, stockings hung on the computer screen with care and our grandchildren skyping with Santa rather than visiting him at the local mall or firehouse. Let's stop this tech slippery slope before it begins and refuse to let go of the human, personalized touch- keep the cursive in Christmas (and every season)!

Readers can e-mail Peg DeGrassa at pdegrassa@delconewsnetwork.com or write her c/o DCNN, 1914 Parker Ave., Holmes, PA 19043.

As soon as the last plate of Thanksgiving turkey was cleared from the table it seemed the holiday cards began to arrive in my mailbox. Call me a dinosaur, but I still love writing and receiving Christmas cards- and I am not talking about the electronic kind. Besides looking at the beautiful pictures and sparkly scenes on the cards, I thoroughly enjoy reading the little notes and greetings that my friends and family write inside. I often find myself admiring, in addition to their words, the writers' beautiful or unique cursive handwriting.

I've been a fan of the art of cursive handwriting for as long as I can remember. I guess the seed was planted back in Catholic grade school when "Handwriting" was taught as an actual subject and we received a grade for it on our report cards. I was never an excellent handwriter (my grades were usually somewhere in the 80s), but I would aspire to have handwriting like some of the others in my class who garnered 90s in handwriting on their report cards or even won the coveted "Penmanship Award" at the end of the school year (dare to dream!). In my sharp crazy memory, I can still remember who those stellar handwriters were.

Every September when we would get our new text books for the year, we would receive a brand new Penmanship book. Along with that, we would have to purchase a "Palmer Method" pen. The pen, which came in yellow, red, black or blue, had a large bump around its center where students would learn to hold their fingers, strategically placed, to produce beautiful writing. In the books, we students would trace different letters and then connect them before writing the same words ourselves freestyle on empty lines below. If we "didn't get it," and still wrote the words sloppily, we might have to take out a sheet of loose leaf paper and write a whole page or two of the words or letters we had trouble mastering that night for homework. I remember having trouble with the letters z, k and f and capitals Q and X. But I practiced to score those 80s!

Fast forward some years and I remember sitting with my own children, helping them master the same handwriting skills and praising them when they took extra care to write their homework assignments neatly. I remember they felt so "grown up" to finally be in a grade that required them to write like their parents and older siblings or cousins instead of printing like those in the younger grades do. So, keeping all this in mind, it would come as no surprise to find out how devastated I was when over 40 states decided not that long ago to drop teaching cursive writing from the required core curriculum and replace it with keyboarding. According to my understanding, it is now the individual school districts that decide if they do or don't want to teach cursive handwriting. In other words, teaching cursive handwriting has become an option.

I understand that computers are taking over everything and we can sign banking, real estate and all legal papers electronically these days. But what about when we scribble a signed absence or lateness note to our child's teacher? Sign a permission slip for a Scout's field trip? Sit in a doctor's office signing our life away before getting treatment? We have to do all of this on our computers in the future?

If children do not learn to write and read cursive handwriting, how will they read the original documents on which our country was founded (not a printed version) or any primary historical sources or diaries in museums or historical sites? What about a simple letter from grandmom or an uncle in the service? What if a computer goes down while important papers are being signed? Or will mail carriers of the future be required to learn Handwriting as a second language?

Getting taught handwriting is a discipline, a skill we keep for a lifetime. Some may say learning to recite poetry or mastering algebra or calculus problems won't actually be useful in the course of life, but all together, these things orchestrate a good, solid education. Once a student has these skills in their bag of tricks, their foundation, they can blossom in many other ways educationally and later, professionally. In addition to teaching eye-hand coordination, mastering handwriting shows refinement and the ability to communicate successfully in a global world with or without a computer keyboard. Of course mastering keyboarding is essential and a necessary skill, but why can't children be taught both, as they have been in the last ten years or more? If it isn't broke, why fix it?

Last week I covered a Christmas party that the Knights of Columbus hosted for Religious Sisters in the Philadelphia Archdiocese. After snapping some photos, I was going to get the names of the photo subjects, but the music was playing and it was noisy. Afraid I wouldn't hear well and misspell names, I passed my notepad and pen around and let the Sisters write their own names. When I was back at the office, writing my photo captions, one of the things I was struck by, was how lovely each and every one of the Sisters' handwriting was. I didn't have to wonder if a letter was an "o" or an "a" or a "v" or a "u." Their writing was Palmer Method Perfect.

"No wonder," I thought. "The Sisters are the ones who taught so many of us how to write clearly and neatly." A dying art? I don't think so. I like to think of it as the hallmark of a civilized, educated society. Although just about everything we do is generated through our computers, I do believe there's still a time and place for cursive. Call me old fashioned, but I believe we can still have the best of both worlds.

I know resources are tight and all kinds of programs, even art and music, are being cut from core curriculums in schools to meet budgets. I realize students use iPads and laptops instead of pens and notebooks. I try to stay with the times so I get all that. But I also get those beautiful Christmas cards, some that even have letters enclosed, in the mail. I can't help but think how intimate and personal they are when they have handwritten notes in them and how much I would miss that human touch if they were merely churned out by a computer printer.

I can visualize my brothers' and sisters' handwriting with closed eyes, as well as my husband's my children's, my parents', my friends' and even some of my co-workers'. As you know from people's signatures, our cursive handwriting is our own, unique to only us. I would hate to think that in one holiday season in the future that all of my cards will be waiting to be opened in e-mails on my computer instead of delivered to the mailbox on my front porch.

When I thought about this subject a week or so ago, I quickly polled by Facebook friends to hear their thoughts. Maybe we are all dinosaurs, but like me, not one person thought cutting cursive from core curriculum had any merit. Everyone agreed that children should still be taught cursive handwriting.

If we allow computer generated cards to replace the handwritten oldie but goodie snail-mail type, who knows, in years to come if we may have to enjoy a virtual Christmas tree, stockings hung on the computer screen with care and our grandchildren skyping with Santa rather than visiting him at the local mall or firehouse. Let's stop this tech slippery slope before it begins and refuse to let go of the human, personalized touch- keep the cursive in Christmas (and every season)!

Readers can e-mail Peg DeGrassa at pdegrassa@delconewsnetwork.com or write her c/o DCNN, 1914 Parker Ave., Holmes, PA 19043.

Saturday, December 14, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Victor Cruz Says Jay Z Just Getting Started With Huge Robinson Cano Deal

(AllHipHop News) "Scott Boras, you over baby. robinson cano jay z Cano you coming with me. These n***as like rotary phones. It's a new day. Hit up KD," rapped Jay Z on the Magna Carta Holy Grail track "Crown." Jay was essentially telling established sports agent Scott Boras and the rest of the world that his new Roc Nation Sports agency was going to be major force whether they liked it or not.

[ALSO READ: Jay Z Ranks His Own Catalogue From Best To Worst Albums]

While there were many critics who believed that the Brooklyn mogul could not effectively make the transition from music to athletics, the recent 10-year/$240 million contract with the Seattle Mariners Jay secured for Cano seems to be proving the naysayers wrong for the moment. Another one of Roc Nation's athletes expressed his view that the third largest contract in baseball history was just the beginning for Jay and Roc Nation.

"It's just a stepping stone," said New York Giants receiver Victor Cruz. "It's a true testament to the way [Jay Z] does his business, and the way he goes about it - the right way."

Roc Nation/CAA is now home to Cano, Cruz, NBA superstar Kevin Durant, New York Jets quarterback Geno Smith, and WNBA player Skylar Diggins. On the music side, there is talk that Jay is about to add L.A. rapper Nipsey Hussle to the Roc Nation roster after recently signing separate deals with Young Jeezy's CTE imprint and producer DJ Mustard.

[ALSO READ: EXCLUSIVE Hip-Hop Rumor: Guess Who Is Joining Roc Nation?]
Tuesday, December 10, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

'Howl-iday' activities

The aspca christmas cards lab, face sprinkled with sugar-like white, lay quietly in his kennel. His struggle to stand and walk didn't go unnoticed. Staff at the Casper Humane Society (CHS) estimated the dog's age to be between 11 and 13. They waited for his owner to come looking for him. Henry, as the staff later called him, came in as a stray. But no one claimed him. Henry's sweet, gentle spirit touched the hearts of both CHS staff and volunteers. His physical pain was evident, but his friendly, gentle demeanor didn't waver. Henry was given treatment for the arthritis captivating his body as his temporary caregivers waited for a new family to adopt him.

Nearly two months passed. On Nov. 3, Henry received not just a new human family, but a whole new life, sharing a country home with people, four other dogs, and a few horses. A member of his adoptive family posted on Facebook: "He is kind and loving and just grateful to be here with us ... He is a treasure - a gift." It was a story celebrated on the CHS Facebook page.

"Henry's story was seen by more people than any other Facebook posting - 10,944 in fact - more than any other animal since I've been here," said Angela Letz, CHS shelter director. "His [adoption] story had 617 likes and 57 comments. It was incredible!"

Adoption stories have transpired for the CHS for nearly 60 years. The organization started in 1956, according to CHS Board President Sally Adams-Reinhart. The history and positive stories continue because the community supports the organization.

The CHS receives no city, county, state or federal funds; it relies on the generosity and care of Casper's citizens and also works with other organizations in the community. For example, the Hector Foundation awarded money to the CHS to help purchase sliders for the Bunkhouse, a building addition that still awaits completion in order to house more dogs and cats.

"We still need fencing and sliders," Reinhart stated, "and we're still short of funds to complete the project."

Community members will have an opportunity to help support the CHS during a few upcoming events. On Saturday, Dec. 7, Grant Street Grocery will host "Happy Howl-iday," a wine and cheese tasting featuring four or five different wines and cheeses. Various vendors will be on hand selling wares with part of the proceeds being donated to the CHS. The event runs from 12-4 p.m. and features handcrafted jewelry and at least one author with inspirational dog books. Tickets for several raffle items also will be sold, said Reinhart. Those items include a $500 meat package from Grant Street Grocery, a $100 VISA gift card, a custom-made dog bed, a bottle of Wyoming Whiskey, and a home visit from Santa Claus.

"All proceeds from the raffle go to the Humane Society, and vendors will give some sale proceeds back to us," she said.

Twelve different raffle items are available. Drawings will be held weekly through Dec. 20, the final day of the raffle, Reinhart added.

On Saturday, Dec. 14, Pet Photos with Santa takes place at Market Square in downtown Casper. From 10 a.m.-2 p.m., people can get photos of their pets taken with Santa Claus; a portion of the photographer's $10 sitting fee will go to the CHS, Reinhart said. This event is held in conjunction with Tails of the City, a pet supply store in Market Square, which will be hosting an open house.

The CHS's annual Giving Tree began Nov. 29. A decorated Christmas tree provides tags by which potential donors can give a variety of supplies, meeting many of the shelter's needs, Reinhart explained. Items such as cleaning supplies, paper goods and pet food are daily requirements, and community members can help the shelter help the animals in its care by donating these items.

"We especially need Purina Cat Chow," said Reinhart. "We've got so many cats; we go through it like crazy."

The Giving Tree, located in center court at Eastridge Mall, will be up until Christmas Eve.

Pictures and descriptions of some of the adoptable pets will be available at the events, and at times on weekends some of the available dogs will make an appearance at the Giving Tree, Reinhart said.

One of the dogs hoping to find a home during this holiday season is Snipe, a 9-year-old male Pointer mix. Like Henry, Snipe suffers from arthritis, but his friendly personality doesn't waver as this older boy awaits his forever home. Perhaps, like Henry, Snipe will receive that special gift of a new, loving family so he, too, could have a "Happy Howl-iday."

To learn more about the upcoming events or the pets available for adoption, call the CHS at 265-5439 or go to www.chswyo.org.

Wednesday, December 4, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Nikon D5300 First Shots: Can Nikon's new mid-level DSLR not only beat the D5200, but compete with the D7100?

<Nikon D5300 Couponsp>by Roger Slavens

In less than a year's time, the recently introduced Nikon D5300 has replaced the mid-level consumer D5200 DSLR. And while its upgrades may not be revolutionary, the new model stands as a compelling, affordable option for advanced amateurs who may be eyeing the higher-end, prosumer D7100 -- as well as an enticement for owners of Nikon's older models to take a step up. We just got the Nikon D5300 into the lab, and we've published our first batch of First Shots -- Still Life* test images -- for you to analyze closely.

The D5300's enhanced DX-format, 24-megapixel APS-C-type CMOS sensor was designed to maximize the camera's resolving power by omitting the optical low-pass filter (as Nikon did earlier this year with the D7100). If the D5300 can minimize moire and anti-aliasing as well as the D7100 did, forgoing the OLPF in a consumer-friendly DSLR could be the move that opens up a realm of incredible detail and sharpness to a mass audience. What's more, the D5300 incorporates Nikon's latest processor -- the EXPEED 4 -- which even the company's most recently announced full-frame prosumer DSLR, the D610, doesn't have. This next-generation imaging engine purports optimize the DSLR's detail-versus-noise output and enhance color accuracy, and its improved ISO sensitivity -- now ranging from 100 to 12,800 in standard mode -- could up the ante on low-light performance.

How do all these upgrades translate in terms of image quality?

Check out our Nikon D5300 First Shots for yourself. And be sure to pit these test images side-by-side with those from the D5200, D7100 -- or any other camera we've ever tested -- via our Comparometer™ image quality comparison tool.

For more information about the DSLR's new features and specs, read our first impressions Nikon D5300 review. In addition to image quality and performance enhancements, the camera also boasts built-in Wi-Fi functionality and GPS -- the first Nikon DSLR to do so -- as well as a more compact and lightweight design, and a 3-2-inch tilt-swivel LCD monitor that features a whopping 1,037K dots of resolution.

* Use our Still Life target images to look for detail (tone-on-tone, fine, highlights, shadows), as well as noise suppression, white balance, color accuracy and color shape retention.

Order your Nikon D5300 with trusted Imaging Resource affiliates Adorama or B&H now. The D5300 body runs about US$700, and kitted with a Nikon 18-140mm lens about $1,400.

Adorama:

B&H:


Source: Imaging-resource
Friday, November 22, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Nikon D5300 Review

<Nikon D5300 Buy Cheapp>

Introduction

The Nikon D5300 is a new 24.2 megapixel DSLR camera with no optical low-pass filter that can record Full HD movies at 1080/50/60p with stereo sound and comes equipped with built-in Wi-Fi and GPS. A high-resolution 3.2-inch vari-angle LCD monitor makes it easier to compose your shots from difficult angles, while the extensive ISO range of 100-25600 should cope with virtually all lighting conditions. A 5fps burst shooting mode, EXPEED 4 image processor, 39-point autofocus system with nine cross-type sensors, 2,016-pixel RGB metering sensor, High Dynamic Range mode, Active D-Lighting, and nine different special effects for stills and movies complete the Nikon D5300's headline specs. Available in three colours, black, grey and red, the Nikon D5300 costs £729.99 / $799.95 / €899 body only, or £829.99 / €1029 with the 18-55mm VR kit lens, and $1,399.95 with the AF-S NIKKOR 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens.

Ease of Use

The Nikon D5300 replaces the year-old D5200 as the new mid-range model in Nikon's extensive DSLR line-up, slotting in between the existing D3200 and D7000 models, not only in terms of feature set and functionality, but also in terms of size and weight. It isn't quite as compact and lightweight as the D3200, but neither is it as bulky and heavy as the D7000. In comparison to its predecessor, the D5300 is slightly smaller and lighter than the D5200. The right-hand grip is deep and therefore quite comfortable for photographers with large hands and/or longish fingers, and there's also a handy rubberised thumb rest on the back of the body.

The D5100's 24.1 megapixel CMOS sensor has been superseded by a 24.2 megapixel sensor with no optical low-pass filter, which promises to deliver slightly finer details. The sensor can clean itself by way of high-frequency vibrations that will, at least in theory, shake off any non-adhesive dust particles that may have settled on the low-pass filter during a lens change. You can specify, via an option in the Setup menu, whether you want sensor cleaning to take place at shutdown, startup, both or neither, with the default being 'both'. The cleaning process pleasingly has no practical impact on startup times, which were near instant. The new image sensor is complemented by the more powerful EXPEED 4 processing engine and a larger buffer as well.

The D5300 is the first Nikon DSLR to offer both built-in wi-fi and GPS connectivity, instead of relying on optional accessories like all previous models. The wi-fi function essentially pairs the D5300 with an iOS or Android smartphone or other smart device, and allows you to eidt and share images directly to social networking sites like Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. It also makes it possible to control the D5300 remotely via a smart device using the free Wireless Mobile Utility app, and set the focus point using the smart device's touchscreen. The built-in GPS/A-GPS receiver logs location information such as latitude, longitude, and altitude in the image's EXIF data, even when the camera is turned off, allowing you to retrace your steps even when you're not taking photos.

The 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 VR kit lens that Nikon supplied feels fairly well-balanced on the Nikon D5300 and it fits into place with a reassuring mechanical click. It also adds the very important advantage of Vibration Reduction. Nikon bodies don't offer any form of in-camera image stabilisation, unlike similar models from Sony, Pentax and Olympus, so the affordable 18-55mm VR lens is a good starting point if you don't already have any Nikon lenses.

The shutter release action on the Nikon D5300 is surprisingly quiet, with a dampened mirror slap that makes this DSLR actually quieter than some rangefinder cameras. Furthermore, there is a Quiet Shutter Release mode, in which the mirror is raised fairly slowly to further reduce the sound it makes. This does, however, introduce some shutter lag, which usually isn't worth the few decibels of difference versus what is already an impressively quiet shutter.

FrontRear

The Nikon D5300 follows conventional DSLR design in having a shooting mode dial on the top of the camera, which allows you to select either one of the advanced modes like Manual, Aperture- or Shutter-priority, or a number of scene modes. The Exposure Compensation button is thoughtfully positioned next to the shutter release. Hold down this button with your right forefinger and spin the control wheel on the top-rear of the camera with your thumb to adjust its settings - simple and intuitive.

The Effects shooting mode, first introduced on the D5100, now provides 9 different filters that can be applied to both still images and movies. The Night Vision effect is particularly worth of mention, pushing the camera's sensitivity to a whopping ISO 102,400, although a monochrome rather than colour image is recorded. For stills, you can enter Live View mode to preview the effect or simply use the optical viewfinder. For movies, the recording is slowed down (dependent upon the chosen effect) as the camera uses a lot of processing power to apply the effect, leading to footage that can have a rather staccato feel. Note also that the camera sets virtually everything in the Effects mode - exposure, shutter speed, white balance, ISO, file type and quality - so its only creative in terms of the arty effect that's applied. Several of the same effects can be applied to an image or movie that you've taken, though, so you can have the best of both worlds (albeit without the luxury of a preview).

The second button sitting next to the shutter release is labeled 'info'. This button is arguably at the heart of the Nikon D5300's ease-of-use, as like its predecessor the camera lacks the monochromatic status LCD of the older D90, so Nikon had to provide a different way to check vital shooting information without having to look into the viewfinder. Enter the info button - pressing it displays virtually all of the camera's main settings on the large rear screen. Pressing the "i" button on the rear of the D5300 then allows you to interact with and set the onscreen options, with 14 available in total.

The rear articulated LCD screen is hinged at the side rather than the bottom. This fully articulated design is a much more flexible solution, allowing the screen to be folded out from the left side of the camera and folded inwards to protect it when not in use. The screen is slightly bigger than the D5200 at 3.2 inches and higher resolution too, with 1,037k dots, so there's nothing to complain about in this department. The screen also has an anti-glare coating, so that it's usable most of the time outdoors in strong daylight, although it still struggled a little with reflections.

The D5300's Live View is accessed in a different and arguably less intuitive way than on the D3200/D7100. Instead of a combined switch / button on the D3200/D7000, the D5300 has a fore-finger operated spring-loaded switch on top of the body that is pushed downwards and toggles between turning Live View on and off. Positioned next to the Shooting Mode dial, it allows you to enable Live View whilst holding the camera at arms length with one hand, or to turn it off as you hold the camera up to your eye. We'd prefer it to be on the rear of the camera and also to incorporate the Movie record button, in keeping with the D3200/D7100 models.

Press the Lv switch and the mirror flips up, the shutter opens and the rear screen displays the scene as seen through the lens. There is a red rectangle in the middle, which you can move practically anywhere in the frame. When in manual focus (MF) mode, you can magnify into this rectangle in a number of steps by repeatedly pressing the button marked with a loupe icon, but this magnification seems to be at least partially interpolated. This means that you cannot see detail down to the pixel level, unlike some competing cameras.

Fortunately, MF is not the only focusing option in Live View, at least as long as you are taking stills. Single-servo AF (AF-S) and Full-time-servo AF (AF-F) modes are also available and, while slow, they tend to be accurate. Both modes can also be used in connection with face detection. 'Face-priority AF' had no problem finding and keeping track of human faces as long as they were facing the camera, but acquiring focus was another story - very, very slow.

Live View must also be entered to shoot movies. After pressing the Lv button and optionally presetting the aperture and focus, you can start recording video by pressing the dedicated Movie Record button on top of the camera next to the shutter release. The camera records full high-definition, wide-screen video in 1920x1080 pixel resolution, at a frame rate of 60p/50p/30p/25p/24p, in AVI format using the motion JPEG codec. As with Live View, contrast-detect AF is possible whilst shooting movies, although as with still images there's an audible whine as the camera refocuses and it's still too slow to focus on any fast-moving subject, so much so that we suspect most serious users will use manual focusing instead. Although the D5300 can automatically focus during video recording, it's just not fast enough to warrant regular use.

You can set both the aperture and the shutter speed during movie recording, although the slowest shutter speed is limited to 1/30th second, plus exposure compensation and AE-Lock can also be set. Out of the box the D5300 can record stereo sound via its built-in microphone with three different levels of sensitivity on offer, and improved sound can also be recorded using an optional external microphone. The maximum size of a single video clip is 2 gigabytes which, given that movies occupy about 100 megabytes of storage space per minute, would theoretically translate into about 20 minutes of continuous recording.

The D5300 has a proper through-the-lens optical viewfinder with a slightly improved magnification of 0.82x, on par with most of its rivals. The Nikon D5300's 39 auto-focus points are permanently marked on the focusing screen, whereas the compositional grid lines can be called up via a menu option. Two warning signs - telling you that the battery is running low or you have forgotten to insert a memory card - may also appear in the form of overlaid icons when appropriate. Below the finder is a traditional monochromatic status bar showing practically all relevant shooting information (including the ISO sensitivity, if so specified in the menu).

As stated above, the Nikon D5300 has 39 auto-focus sensors, out of which 9 are cross type. The other thirty are of the line variety, consequently being only sensitive to either vertical or horizontal detail, but not both. In practice, this did not turn out to be a real problem, with the camera typically locking focus on the subject quickly and easily, no matter which AF point was selected. In the viewfinder, the active AF point appears in red, which is easy to see. Selecting the active AF point is done by way of the four-way pad - except if you choose Auto Area AF - again a simple and intuitive solution. In low light, the AF sensors are helped by an AF assist lamp located on the front plate of the camera.

The 2,016-pixel RGB metering sensor used by the D5300 is again identical to the system used by the more expensive D7100 model. This provides precise data to the camera's Scene Recognition System, which optimises exposure, autofocus and white balance immediately before the shutter is released.

Memory Card SlotBattery Compartment

The Nikon D5300 only has one control wheel and there are no dedicated buttons for controlling ISO sensitivity, white balance, metering or AF mode. The Fn button can be reprogrammed to perform ISO selection or white balance adjustment (or one of a few other functions such as file quality specification), but the others still have to be set through the main info screen, called up by pressing the [ i ] button top-right of the rear display. With practice, performing adjustments via this screen becomes fairly quick and easy, but it's not as efficient as the older D90's dedicated controls.

Most of the camera's rear controls are scattered, seemingly almost randomly, to the right of the D5300's large folding screen. While we can understand the need to locate them to accomodate the 3 inch LCD, the positioning of the Zoom In and Zoom Out buttons in particular isn't very intuitive, being operated with your right-hand thumb, and right next to the Delete button. As the D5300 isn't a very complex camera in terms of the number of external controls, it thankfully doesn't get too confusing, but is something to consider from an ergonomic point of view.

For the images that you've already already captured, the Nikon D5300 offers a broad range of retouching tools, including post-capture D-lighting (useful if you forgot to turn on Active D-lighting before capture), red-eye correction, trimming, monochrome conversion, different filter effects, colour adjustments, image resizing, image overlay, in-camera raw processing, quick auto retouching, straightening of crooked pictures, lens distortion correction, fisheye, colour outline, colour sketch, selective colour, miniature effect, and perspective control. Many of these functions make it unnecessary to buy specialised computer programs or plug-ins and spend hours in front of a computer to achieve a desired/popular effect.

The Nikon D5300 is powered by a proprietary EN-EL14a Lithium-ion battery, good for 600 shots, and records videos and image files on SD/SDHC/SDXC cards. As we noted in our D5200 review, we would really have liked to see Nikon add a second card slot for Compact Flash cards, so that owners of higher-specified Nikon DSLRs who buy a D5300 as a second body can use their existing memory cards. It also lacks the dual-SD slots of the D7100. As far as connectivity goes, there are USB/VideoOut and Mini HDMI ports as well as an accessory terminal for the connection of a wired remote or a GPS unit, all sheltered behind a door on the left side of the camera, when viewed from the back.

That concludes our look at the D5300's interface and feature-set. Now let's take a look at the D5300's image quality...

Entry Tags


Source: Photographyblog
Wednesday, November 20, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Nikon NEF Codec updated with support for Nikon DF, D5300 digital SLRs

by Mike Tomkins

Planning to pick up one of Nikon D5300 Offers's latest digital SLRs as soon as it hits the market, and want to be ready when it shows up? If so -- and if you're using a Windows XP, Vista, 7, or 8 computer -- we've got a download you'll want to grab.

Nikon has just updated its NEF Codec package, which lets Windows machines display thumbnails of .NEF raw images in Windows Explorer, just as they do for your JPEG files. The latest release, NEF Codec v1.20.0, adds support for the recently-announced, soon-to-ship Nikon DF and D5300 digital SLRs. It follows on from the recent version 1.19.0, which newly supported the Nikon 1 AW1 and D610.

If you want to update your Nikon raw support in Explorer, download a copy of the free Nikon NEF Codec package now.

(via Nikon Rumors)


Source: Imaging-resource
Tuesday, November 19, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Nikon D5300 RELEASED - Specs, Price Availability: What Are The First Impressions?

<Nikon D5300 Cyber Monday Dealp>Nikon has just released its brand new D5300 DSL camera, where the Wi-Fi feature in this model is a first for the company in single-lens reflex camera design, according to Gadget Review.

The latest model of the DX-format DSLR has 24.2 megapixels, a DX-format CMOS sensor with no optical low-pass filter, built-in Wi-Fi capabilities, a built-in GPS, a durable light body, a 3.2-inch 1037k-dot vari-angle LCCD monitor with wide viewing angle, NAL-1 features for zoom/focus assist, and more.

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It also has a full-HD 1920x1080/60p capability for movies, where selection can range from 24, 25, 30,50, and 60p. There are also 9 special effects for creative expression.

As previously reported, Nikon Rumors reports that the Nikon D5300 is expected to be introduced before the Photo Plus show in NYC at the end of the month or the CES show in Las Vegas in January.

It is reported that this will be the first camera to get the new EXPEED 4 processor. Some other rumored specs include 24 Megapixels, 39 AF points, built-in Wi-Fi and built-in GPS.

Photography Bay reports that the D530 will be introduced as an entry-level APS-C format camera. There are no reports yet of whether or not it will have better image quality over the D5200, but it would make sense to add additional video features to the D5300.

The price is $799 for the body only, where it is available in black, red, and a Nikon gray finish.


Source: Designntrend
Monday, November 18, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Nikon Instruments, Inc. Introduces Ti-LAPP

MELVILLE, N.Y., Nov. 11, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Nikon, Inc. is pleased to introduce the new Ti-LAPP, an innovative new laser application system designed for Nikon's inverted research microscopes, the ECLIPSE Ti. With more than 32 different configurations spanning a wide variety of applications, the Ti-LAPP system provides researchers with unparalleled flexibility and modularity. The system will debut at the 43rd Society for Neuroscience Meeting, taking place November 9-13 in San Diego.
The Ti-LAPP system provides modular illumination modalities ranging from simple epi-fluorescence, to total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), photobleaching and digital micromirror device-mediated photoactivation. This modularity enables users the freedom to custom combine different imaging modalities to suit their needs. The system works seamlessly with Nikon's popular NIS-Elements software, as well. By providing multiple modes of imaging on the same microscope, the Ti-LAPP system offers ease of experimentation as well as time and money saved, since users will no longer need to purchase multiple microscopes or systems to support different modes.
"Optical imaging techniques have evolved rapidly beyond just qualitative visualization. The Ti-LAPP system responds to those advances in imaging technologies and probes that further enable researchers to quantitatively address biological questions," said Stephen Ross, Ph.D, General Manager of Product and Marketing for Nikon Instruments, Inc. "This is the first system providing researchers with the ability to combine multiple imaging techniques with ease on the same imaging platform, as well as the freedom to make additional modifications to those configurations as research and experiments evolve and change."
The main features of the Nikon Ti-LAPP system include:
  • Modular illuminators for incredible flexibility and expandability. The Ti-LAPP system modularizes illumination modalities, including epi-fluorescence, total internal reflection fluorescence, photobleaching and photoactivation. Individual modules can be combined to provide a fully-customized imaging system for the user. The modularity and flexibility of the LAPP system also provides for future expandability and modification as the needs of the user change.
  • Combination with Nikon Ti provides ultimate versatility. The stratum structure of Nikon's inverted research microscope, the ECLIPSE Ti, enables even more complex combinations of illumination modules. By utilizing two illumination layers, the system can accommodate up to five different illumination modules - epi-fluorescence, manual TIRF, fully-motorized and auto-alignment TIRF, manual FRAP and DMD.
  • New H-TIRF module for high performance TIRF illumination. The H-TIRF module provides auto-alignment for TIRF and auto-adjustment of incident angles for optimizing the evanescent field depth. The auto-alignment and adjustments can be made independently for each wavelength and experiment, and the settings can be saved and re-used for consistent results.
  • New digital micromirror device module for user-defined ROI based photostimulation. This module enables multi-point simultaneous photoactivation at user-defined positions as well as precision patterning of illumination, capabilities that are of great utility in the emerging field of optogenetics.
The new Nikon Ti-LAPP system will be available in Spring 2014.
ABOUT NIKON INSTRUMENTS INC.
Nikon Instruments Inc. is a world leader in the development and manufacture of optical and digital imaging technology for biomedical applications. Now in its 96th year, Nikon provides complete optical systems that offer optimal versatility, performance and productivity. Cutting-edge instruments include microscopes, digital imaging products and software. Nikon Instruments is one of the microscopy and digital imaging arms of Nikon Inc., the world leader in digital imaging, precision optics and photo imaging technology. For more information, visit www.nikoninstruments.com. Product-related inquiries may be directed to Nikon Instruments at 800-52-NIKON.
Lia LoBello Peppercomm 212.931.6180 Trisha Bruynell Peppercomm 212.931.6129 other press releases by Nikon Instruments
Melville, New York, UNITED STATES
http://www.nikoninstruments.com
Lia LoBello Peppercomm 212.931.6180 Trisha Bruynell Peppercomm 212.931.6129
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Source: Globenewswire
Monday, November 11, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Round 2: Nikon Releases Another Teaser for Its Upcoming Retro Full-Frame

<Nikon D5300 Dealsp>

Whether or not the camera will live up to the hype, we won't know until we've gotten our hands on it. But if there's one thing Nikon is doing right regarding the soon-to-be-released retro-styled full-frame, it's building a crap load of hype.

We've already had one teaser trailer (which you can watch here), and now, Nikon has released another, this one giving us tantalizing split-second glances of the camera that we didn't see at all in the previous ad.

Here are a couple of shots of the camera - supposedly named the "Nikon DF," not D4H as previously reported - we pulled out of the video (click the photos for higher resolution):

This obviously isn't the first teaser, and if the description is to be believed it won't be the last either. The video is described as another chapter in "a series of short movies depicting a photographer roaming through Scotland with a camera as his only companion."

It goes on to talk about a journey of self-discovery, but if we're being honest, the most compelling part of the ad (at least for most people) seems to be the slow journey of discovering the Nikon DF on the way to its rumored November 6th release. So stay tuned, chances are we'll be seeing more sneak peeks like this over the course of this week.

To see a list of rumored specs for the upcoming shooter, check out our previous coverage by clicking here. And if you want to see the first teaser, click here.

(via Nikon Rumors)


Source: Petapixel
Friday, November 1, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Nikon D600 Marked As Discontinued

<Nikon D5300 Discountp>Back in 2012, Nikon announced the D600 DSLR camera but it looks like a little over a year later, the camera manufacturer has decided to discontinue the device. This is according to a listing on B&H which states that the camera has since been discontinued by the manufacturer, meaning that photographers who are thinking about getting their hands on the device will no longer be able to. Of course there will still be some stock left and should be available through a variety of retailers, although like we said since it has been discontinued, whatever stock is left is pretty much all there is. Photographers who wish to get their hands on the Nikon D600 will probably have to act quickly just in case their local retailers run out stock.

The reason for the discontinuation of the D600 is due to the release of the Nikon D610 which was announced earlier this month. The innards of the D610 is expected to be similar to the D600, although the changes made were to its shutter mechanism which was reportedly improved, and quiet, continuous shooting options, higher FPS rate, and improved white balance. Given that the camera's release is in October, we guess it makes sense for Nikon to discontinue the Nikon D600 lest it ends up competing with the newer model or confuses customers.


Source: Ubergizmo
Monday, October 28, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Nikon Unveils D5300 DSLR With WiFi, GPS

By Greg Tarr On Oct 17 2013 - 10:59am


Nikon's Nikon D5300 Cheap ($799 body only) is the company's first DSLR to incorporate WiFi and GPS geotagging.

Melville, N.Y. - Nikon introduced Thursday its D5300 D-SLR, offering an enhanced 24.2 megapixel CMOS sensor and a Nikon-first built-in Wi-Fi and GPS.

The company also added an AF-S NIKKOR 58mm f/1.4G lens prime lens.

Nikon's D5300, which will be available in October for a $799.95 (body only) suggested retail price or $1,399.95 for a kit including the camera and an AF-S Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens , is the company's first D-SLR with built-in Wi-Fi and GPS functionality to provide instant photo sharing with smartphones or tablets, and to enable geotagging images.

The camera incorporates a 24.2-megapizel DX-format CMOS sensor and is features a compact, lightweight ergonomically body design.

Other key features include a 3.2-inch swiveling Vari-angle LCD display; a 39-point AF system with 9 cross-type sensors; 5 fps continuous shooting, FullHD 1080p video capture with built-in stereo microphone; intuitive scene recognition and a variety of image efects and in-camera editing tools.

The D5300 will be available in a choice of black, red and gray body colors.

The AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G lens, which will be available in October for a $1,699.95 suggested retail price, will accommodate both FX and DX format cameras offering high quality low-light shooting performance.

Nikon said the unusual 58mm focal length is ideal for portraits, landscapes and street photography.


Source: Twice
Saturday, October 26, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Nikon Unveils D5300 DSLR With WiFi, GPS

By Greg Tarr On Oct 17 2013 - 10:59am


Nikon's Nikon D5300 Cyber Monday Deal ($799 body only) is the company's first DSLR to incorporate WiFi and GPS geotagging.

Melville, N.Y. - Nikon introduced Thursday its D5300 D-SLR, offering an enhanced 24.2 megapixel CMOS sensor and a Nikon-first built-in Wi-Fi and GPS.

The company also added an AF-S NIKKOR 58mm f/1.4G lens prime lens.

Nikon's D5300, which will be available in October for a $799.95 (body only) suggested retail price or $1,399.95 for a kit including the camera and an AF-S Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens , is the company's first D-SLR with built-in Wi-Fi and GPS functionality to provide instant photo sharing with smartphones or tablets, and to enable geotagging images.

The camera incorporates a 24.2-megapizel DX-format CMOS sensor and is features a compact, lightweight ergonomically body design.

Other key features include a 3.2-inch swiveling Vari-angle LCD display; a 39-point AF system with 9 cross-type sensors; 5 fps continuous shooting, FullHD 1080p video capture with built-in stereo microphone; intuitive scene recognition and a variety of image efects and in-camera editing tools.

The D5300 will be available in a choice of black, red and gray body colors.

The AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G lens, which will be available in October for a $1,699.95 suggested retail price, will accommodate both FX and DX format cameras offering high quality low-light shooting performance.

Nikon said the unusual 58mm focal length is ideal for portraits, landscapes and street photography.


Source: Twice
Thursday, October 24, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Capture, Create, Connect: The Nikon D5300 D-SLR Lets Photographers Do It All With Confidence

<Nikon D5300 Couponsp>Related:

MELVILLE, N.Y., Oct. 17, 2013 /PRNewswire/ Today, Nikon Inc. announced the latest addition to its legendary digital SLR lineup, the Nikon D5300. Offering the benefits of SLR performance with the versatility of wireless connectivity, the D5300 allows users to easily capture and share amazing images and videos. Though compact and lightweight, the Nikon D5300 packs an enhanced 24.2-megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor, EXPEED 4 image processing and the convenience of built-in Wi-Fi 1. Users now have the power to take both frame-worthy and share-worthy photos and HD videos with one device no matter where they are.

"With the Nikon D5300, we are continuing our commitment to delivering unparalleled performance and image quality while addressing the importance of staying connected and sharing images with ease," said Masahiro Horie, Director of Marketing and Planning, Nikon Inc. "By answering the need to share high quality photos, the Nikon D5300 allows photographers to capture their memories in astounding clarity and share them with family and friends moments after they happen."

Advanced Performance for When it Matters Most
Making memorable moments even better, the Nikon D5300 offers stunning image quality with sharp, crisp detail to preserve life's precious memories. The enhanced 24.2-megapixel CMOS sensor delivers stunning images and HD videos with heightened clarity and detail due to the removal of the optical low pass filter (OLPF). From planned family portraits to candid moments, the D5300 has the performance, along with easy and intuitive features, to help users capture photos confidently, including:

  • Amazing Low Light Performance For clean, sharp details even in the most challenging lighting conditions including night games and dimly lit restaurants, the Nikon D5300 covers a wide ISO range of 100-12,800 and is expandable to ISO 25,600.
  • EXPEED 4 Image Processing Nikon's most recent image processing engine drives the rapid response and swift performance of the D5300, while maximizing energy efficiency, reducing image noise and delivering true-to-life colors.
  • Scene Recognition System To further help users capture the image they intend, the Nikon D5300 features Nikon's Scene Recognition System and 2,016-pixel RGB metering system to analyze and recognize the scene. Utilizing these systems results in adjustments to exposure, AF and white balance to deliver the best photo possible, whether it's a landscape or portrait.
  • 39-Point AF System Nikon's quick and precise 39-point AF system works with the Scene Recognition System to accurately acquire and track subjects throughout the frame, resulting in tack-sharp images. Kids too active to pose for a photo or pets chasing after a toy are easily captured in brilliant sharpness for memorable photos.
  • 5 Frames-Per-Second While using the optical viewfinder or in Live View, capture great moments that would have otherwise been missed with the D5300's 5 frames-per-second (fps) rate.

Share Like Never Before
The D5300 is Nikon's first D-SLR to feature built-in Wi-Fi, allowing the user to share high quality photos instantly. The Nikon D5300 sends images to the user's smart device, allowing them to share their D-SLR quality photos through e-mail and social media. From a winning touchdown to a surprise proposal, friends and family can now see these important moments clearly captured right after they happen. The Nikon D5300 also includes built-in GPS, another first for Nikon D-SLRs. Now the user can geotag images and allow others to see where life has taken them.

Features for Creativity and Versatility
Compact and lightweight (16.9 oz.), the Nikon D5300 can easily be packed for a day trip or a planned getaway. The small body of the D5300 affords the photographer the freedom to travel while still being easy to handle and comfortable to use. In addition to being able to capture amazing images anywhere, the D5300 is also packed with additional features to promote creativity and versatility, including:

  • 3.2-inch Vari-Angle LCD monitor Whether shooting above a crowd or getting low to capture the details of a flower, users can explore new shots from a dramatic point of view with the large 3.2-inch Vari-angle LCD monitor. This super sharp (1,037K-dot) screen allows photographers to easily make camera adjustments and read menus, while also allowing them to compose the photo they want clearly when shooting from high or low angles. The rotating LCD makes it easy to capture "selfies" at an arm's length away or frame creative perspectives when capturing still photos and HD video.
  • Full HD 1080p Video Capture Create movies fit for the big screen with Full HD 1080p video capture at 60p with built-in stereo, wide ISO range for high quality videos in any light and improved full-time AF to keep the subject in focus.
  • NIKKOR Compatibility The Nikon D5300 is compatible with Nikon's legendary NIKKOR lenses and powerful system accessories, further adding versatility and creativity.

October 2013 for the suggested retail price (SRP) of $1,399.95*. To complement consumers' preferences, the Nikon D5300 will be available in Black, Red and Gray. For more information on the new Nikon D5300 and other Nikon products, please visit Price and Availability
The Nikon D5300 kit with the AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens will be available in www.nikonusa.com.



Press Release, News
Source: Broadwayworld
Wednesday, October 23, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Nikon Unveils D5300 DSLR With WiFi, GPS

By Greg Tarr On Oct 17 2013 - 10:59am


Nikon's Nikon D5300 Cheap ($799 body only) is the company's first DSLR to incorporate WiFi and GPS geotagging.

Melville, N.Y. - Nikon introduced Thursday its D5300 D-SLR, offering an enhanced 24.2 megapixel CMOS sensor and a Nikon-first built-in Wi-Fi and GPS.

The company also added an AF-S NIKKOR 58mm f/1.4G lens prime lens.

Nikon's D5300, which will be available in October for a $799.95 (body only) suggested retail price or $1,399.95 for a kit including the camera and an AF-S Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens , is the company's first D-SLR with built-in Wi-Fi and GPS functionality to provide instant photo sharing with smartphones or tablets, and to enable geotagging images.

The camera incorporates a 24.2-megapizel DX-format CMOS sensor and is features a compact, lightweight ergonomically body design.

Other key features include a 3.2-inch swiveling Vari-angle LCD display; a 39-point AF system with 9 cross-type sensors; 5 fps continuous shooting, FullHD 1080p video capture with built-in stereo microphone; intuitive scene recognition and a variety of image efects and in-camera editing tools.

The D5300 will be available in a choice of black, red and gray body colors.

The AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G lens, which will be available in October for a $1,699.95 suggested retail price, will accommodate both FX and DX format cameras offering high quality low-light shooting performance.

Nikon said the unusual 58mm focal length is ideal for portraits, landscapes and street photography.


Source: Twice
Tuesday, October 22, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Top 5 Halloween Costumes Ideas for Toddlers

Halloween is around the corner and everyone is excited to get new and unique costumes for this year's celebration. Grown up children often have their own ideas on how to dress up for Halloween, but it can be a little tricky job to come up with good and comfortable costumes for your toddler.

There are few factors that have to be considered while selecting a costume for toddlers like their safety, comfort and easiness. If you have a costume in mind, that is brilliant, but if you don't have an idea yet, here are some cool ones!

Animal Costumes

When it comes down to deciding a costume for toddlers, animal costumes always gets the first preference, because toddlers are quite fascinated by the animals. There are plenty of options in this segment; for example, you can dress up your baby as a puppy, kitten, lion, tiger, elephant, monkey or even bear. These costumes are beautiful and adorable; as these are the common costumes, they can be found easily in any local costume store. If you intend to save money this Halloween, making such outfits at home might not be a bad idea either.

Fairytale Characters

The characters from story books and fairytale interest almost every child. Then, why not dress up your toddler in a story book character. Snow white costume, a fairy princess and many other similar choices might fall your way.

Superhero at Rescue

Those who wish that their cute little boys get the limelight can dress them up in a superhero costume. Superman, Batman, and Spiderman are the perfect costume options. You can also consider the star wars costume. These costumes will make your baby look cuter than ever, and it'll certainly fascinate them at the same time.

Home made Costumes

If you are trying to save money, then one best option can be dressing up your toddler as a ghost or any such character from television. Such costumes can be made easily at home without much effort. For the costume, you just need a sweat outfit and little bit of paint, but make sure that you don't come up with something scary and horrifying as little kids get scared easy halloween costumes for boys. So, keep it low and good.

Cartoon Characters

Another good option is to dress up your little girl as mini mouse or tinker bell. This will definitely get your girl a lot of "OMG so pretty" and "oh so cute baby" comments.

Dress Her Up as Butterfly!

You can also consider dressing up your toddler girl as a butterfly or a lady bug. Those who want to go for cartoon character costumes for their little boys can opt for Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and other similar outfits.


Source: Vpsrvr
Sunday, October 20, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

How Welsh rugby fan fashion has changed over the ages

As the Welsh rugby team prepares to unveil its new kit, Robin Turner looks at how fashion on the terraces has changed over the years

Welsh supporters in Paris in 1989

From the flat capped, rattle toting, pipe smoking supporters of the past to the smart casual, team jersey emblazoned fans of today, what Welsh rugby's army face paint of followers are wearing has always provided something to talk about.

And with the launch of the Welsh rugby team's new kit today, supporters from Newport to North Wales will be wondering how they'll suit the new strip.

Welsh rugby chic has been a changeable beast, from the perfect Welsh flag dress worn by a stunning Shirley Bassey in the Millennium Stadium in 1999 to the peculiar modern fad for daffodil hats, face painting and fancy dress, you never know what's coming next.

In the 1950s and '60s, fans would "put on their best" before heading to the Arms Park.

Rugby mad acting genius Richard Burton took the (possibly misguided) decision to take his screen beauty wife Liz Taylor to a Wales v England game at Cardiff Arms Park in 1965 with the Port Talbot born star wearing what looked like an exaggerated football commentator's sheepskin coat on top of a white polo neck jumper while his equally famous beau turned up in a red headscarf and a black fur coat, only taking her dark glasses off to watch the match.

Whether Taylor was in red and black for Burton's beloved Aberavon RFC or Wales, we'll probably never know, but it was a game they would not forget.

View gallery

Burton's brother Graham Jenkins, who watched in an immaculate three-piece suit, later remembered it as "one of the worst experiences of a lack of crowd control that I have ever known."

He was referring to the problems Burton and Taylor had in getting through the star struck crowds.

They were eventually rescued by the Swansea-born Wales full-back Haydn Mainwaring, who cleared a path for them into the hotel kitchen where Burton discovered his expensive coat had been ripped, though, given its oversized fur collars, it's doubtful whether somebody was trying to steal it.

Bard of Glynneath Max Boyce tried to sum up the Welsh rugby fan in one outfit with his giant daffodil, oversized rosette, knitted red rugby jersey, large coat and, as all Welsh fans wore in the 1970s, that beaming smile.

The 1970s rugby fan however, was less fashion troubled than those in the past.

With Bowie, Bolan and co waving goodbye to the more traditional look of previous generations, fans started wearing Wales shirts tucked into their jeans, the 1970s boys with lank, caveman style hair, the girls with feather cuts.

The miners played their part in the '70s too, turning up for games in their work helmets which were fitted with cans of Allbright attached to flexible drinking tubes.

It was in the '80s that the wearing of team jerseys got a firm hold but there was a shock in store for the horizontally challenged.

The Welsh rugby jersey through the years

The 2003 Rugby World Cup saw perhaps the biggest change in design for rugby shirts when Clive Woodward and the scientists from Twickers introduced us to the skin tight rugby shirt, designed to make grasping a player's shirt more difficult.

It also made wearing them more difficult for the average fan who spent too long in Cardiff's Caroline Street...."Chip Alley".

Thankfully, the rugby jersey manufacturers were wise to the customers' pain and sports tops became the basis of a rugby themed casual clothing line promoted by the likes of Cotton Traders (founded by former England rugby captains Fran Cotton and Steve Smith), Eden Park (founded by two French ex-internationals and offering quirky Gavroche hats and stylish suits complete with rugby emblems) and New Zealand brand Canterbury.

Matt Allinson, of men's online fashion site Fashion Beans said: "Most updated rugby tops now feature a slimmer fit and come in an array of colours."

And his fashion advice for rugby jersey wearers is: "When it comes to choosing one, opt for high armholes, cut slim in the sides and colours that either work tonally or complement each other.

"Layer it over an Oxford cloth shirt with some jeans. Use it under your denim jacket for some nice texture contrast. Or simply just wear it by itself with a pair of tweed trousers and loafers. The more you experiment, the more versatile you'll find it to be."

The 1990s ushered in the era of Cool Cymru thanks to a host of pioneering bands like the Manic Street Preachers, Stereophonics, Super Furry Animals, Gorky's Zygotic Mynci, 60ft Dolls and, of course,

Catatonia, whose lead singer Cerys Matthews loved nothing more than to be seen in a Welsh rugby top.

It was a time when supporters celebrated where they came from and rugby shirts with "Valleys Girl" on the back started to be seen.

Earlier this year, for Wales' ultimately victorious Six Nations showdown against England, the Welsh Rugby Union called on fans across the country to create a "sea of red" as extra inspiration for the Welsh dragons on the pitch.

And it seemed to work.

Blockbusting wing George North said of the campaign: "Everyone talks about the positive impact the crowd can have on the pitch because it is true.

"It makes such a difference the players to be able to hear your home fans in full voice on a match day.

"We know going into every game that we have hundreds of thousands of fans behind us, we know we have the best fans in the world game in Wales.

"Looking up to a sea of red in the stands on Saturday or catching site of the good luck messages sent to us via social media or from our friends and family is an inspiration."

WRU chief executive Roger Lewis said at the time: "This display of red unity from our fans, will show the world just why it is so wonderful to be Welsh."


Source: Walesonline
Thursday, October 17, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Kiditude(r) Adds Hashtag T-Shirts to Its Wholesale Line of Rock Baby Clothes in Time for Holiday Shopping

Kiditude.com builds further upon its popular rock baby clothes business with the addition of hashtag onesies. In time for holiday shopping, Kiditude's wholesale clients and retail customers will choose from many, new, trending designs in fresh colors and a larger selection of sizes.

Aberdeen, NJ (PRWEB) October 16, 2013

Kiditude ®, announces the addition of new rock, punk, biker and novelty #hashtag onesies and t-shirts for babies, toddlers, kids and teens.

Originally, a reseller of rock baby clothes, the company has grown to offer more bands in a vast range of sizes as well as produce it's own designs. The brand's past staple items included the parody, " Ipood / Change Me," onesie for babies in white, black, pink and baby blue. Later, came the rock infused, "AB/CD For Those About to Walk," baby one piece bodysuit and toddler t-shirt. Sizes range from 6 months to 2T in multiple colors.

This past summer saw the introduction of Kiditude's "Future Series". The line consists of funny baby, toddler and kids sized clothing declaring the child is the Future Guitarist, Drummer, Rock Star or Biker. Sizing is newborn to 5 years. Plans for additional designs are in progress.

The current Fall line, introduces Kiditude's newest "Social Series". "Hashtags are all the rage right now and the biggest joke lately is the battle over whether the symbol is called a hash tag or a number sign," said Laura Brown, Owner. Kiditude has a dozen hash tag designs including, #cutebaby, #monkey, #pumpkin, #followme, #monster, #princess, #coolkid, #rockstar, #gamer, #angel face designs, #beautiful and #boss. Sizes for the social series range from infant to 18 years. A customer contest will decide the new hash tags to be released in the series. "Our customers know what they want, we want to give them exactly that," asserted Brown.

Kiditude did not forget where it came from and why their customers come back. To appeal to even more shoppers, Kiditude expanded its selection of punk and rock baby clothes. They feature classic rock and rock n roll bands like AC/DC, the Beatles, Guns n Roses and Led Zeppelin among others. A consumer can also find popular punk bands including the Ramones, Misfits and Black Flag. Rockabilly represents with Johnny Cash. Heavy metal fans shop for Metallica, Pantera and Slayer. Clothing is available in baby, toddler, kids and teens sizing ranging from newborn to 18 years. Some items are available in adult sizes.

Popular brands like Harley Davidson, Disney, Minecraft, Lego Chima and Ninjago, Star Wars and superheroes including Batman, Robin, Superman and Supergirl were included in the 2013 lineup. More character garments are scheduled for 2014.

Kiditude's accessory line now includes a larger selection of fashion and winter hats for newborn through adult. Our hats include novelty tattoo and skull patterns for infants, fun guitar knit hats for our toddlers, headphones earmuffs for kids, and Minecraft and superheros beanies for our gamers, teens and adults.

The footwear selection once crib shoes and booties now includes novelty socks for infants, toddlers, kids and teens including mustache socks, skull flip flops, tattoo sneakers, fur lined booties and guitar crib shoes to name a few.

Cool baby bibs, expression pacifiers, receiving and stroller blankets, rock and country lullaby music CDs and cool kids accessories round out the gift giving and purchasing.

Kiditude national and International toll free numbers allows customers to receive assistance via one-on-one over the phone. The Kiditude.com contact us page offers gift givers assistance via email. The Kiditude Blog is a fun read with funny pictures and provides useful information for purchasers on sizing, clothing and accessory care, baby shower etiquette, new products and trends.

Kiditude has gift-wrapping services and gift message cards. For gift buyers who still aren't sure what to get that special someone, Kiditude sells gift certificates in any denomination starting at $25.

International purchasers benefit from the currency converter on the website. Kiditude offers multiple shipping carriers with low cost standard shipping, express shipping and orders over $75 ship free within the USA.

Kiditude encourages customers to "Like" Kiditude on Facebook and "Follow Us" on Twitter. Facebook and Twitter are where customers receive valuable coupon codes, customer product reviews and new product announcements.

Company Information
Kiditude.com, provider of cool apparel for kids with attitude has offices in New Jersey. Kiditude's special collection includes rock onesies and funny t-shirts for babies and toddlers, punk baby clothes and unique baby shower gifts.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/10/prweb11224400.htm

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Source: Newsday
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

OtterBox Commuter Series Wallet: To protect and to serve

OtterBox has been making protective 5s iphone cases otterbox black uggs since 1998, making the company the great-granddaddy of the entire huge smartphone/tablet case market. The company announced a new member of the family yesterday, introducing the Commuter Series Wallet (US$44.95) for the iPhone 5/5s.

We've been seeing a lot of different wallet cases lately, many of which are more wallet (think leather) than protective case. OtterBox has taken the protection of the Commuter Series cases and merged it with a slide-out drawer-like back that can hold up to three credit or ID cards and one folded bill.

Like the other members of the Commuter Series, the Wallet wraps your iPhone 5 or 5s in rubbery silicone that is then surrounded by a tough polycarbonate shell. The screen is covered with a stick-on screen protector (it leaves space for the Touch ID-enabled home button of the iPhone 5s), so your preciousss is going to be in good hands while living in the Commuter Series Wallet.

There's a silicone door that covers the Lightning port, another one that covers the headphone jack, and soft buttons that cover the volume toggle and power switch. Installing the case is a piece of cake, although it takes some muscle to take it back off.

Once the case is on your iPhone 5, you can rest assured that whatever you put into the wallet "drawer" is going to stay put. It makes an audible "click" when shut, and requires a bit of pressure to open. I can verify that two credit cards and a driver's license fit into the case snugly, but I had no cash with which to check out the "one folded bill" claim...

If there's one negative I can find with the Commuter Series Wallet, it's that it's somewhat difficult to get cards out -- a small ramp on the bottom edge of the drawer would have made it a bit easier to slide cards out. As it is, you have to kind of pick them out with your fingers.

The Commuter Series Wallet is available now from OtterBox in black and glacier (white hard shell with gray silicone), and will soon be available in primrose (pinkish hard shell with light gray silicone). The case weighs just 2.0 ounces (56.7 grams), not bad considering the level of protection it provides. Unsurprisingly, it's a little thick at .71 inches (1.8 cm), but when you consider that the case can eliminate the need to carry a separate wallet, that's not a real issue.

Check out the video below for a demonstration of the Commuter Series Wallet Case, and then read on for a chance to win one of these cases.

Conclusion

With the Commuter Series Wallet for iPhone 5/5s, OtterBox has entered the case wallet market with a bang. The case provides the excellent drop protection that the company's line is known for, and provides a convenient and secure way to carry an ID card and some credit cards.

Pros

  • Reasonably priced for a high-quality protective product
  • Very lightweight
  • Positive feedback on the drawer mechanism insures that your cards remain safely stowed
  • Excellent build quality
Cons

    It would be nice if the cards could just slide out with pressure from a thumb; as it is, they must be picked out of the drawer one by one.
Who is it for?

    The iPhone 5/5s owner who is looking both for the protection of one of OtterBox's Commuter Series cases and the convenience of not having to carry a separate wallet

Giveaway

Here are the rules for the giveaway:

  • Open to legal US residents of the 50 United States, the District of Columbia and Canada (excluding Quebec) who are 18 and older.
  • To enter, fill out the form below completely and click or tap the Submit button.
  • The entry must be made before October 8, 2013 11:59PM Eastern Daylight Time.
  • You may enter only once.
  • One winner will be selected and will receive an OtterBox Commuter Series Wallet valued at $44.95
  • Click Here for complete Official Rules.

Source: Tuaw
Tuesday, October 15, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

OtterBox Commuter Series Wallet: To protect and to serve

OtterBox has been making protective 5s iphone cases otterbox military camo netting since 1998, making the company the great-granddaddy of the entire huge smartphone/tablet case market. The company announced a new member of the family yesterday, introducing the Commuter Series Wallet (US$44.95) for the iPhone 5/5s.

We've been seeing a lot of different wallet cases lately, many of which are more wallet (think leather) than protective case. OtterBox has taken the protection of the Commuter Series cases and merged it with a slide-out drawer-like back that can hold up to three credit or ID cards and one folded bill.

Like the other members of the Commuter Series, the Wallet wraps your iPhone 5 or 5s in rubbery silicone that is then surrounded by a tough polycarbonate shell. The screen is covered with a stick-on screen protector (it leaves space for the Touch ID-enabled home button of the iPhone 5s), so your preciousss is going to be in good hands while living in the Commuter Series Wallet.

There's a silicone door that covers the Lightning port, another one that covers the headphone jack, and soft buttons that cover the volume toggle and power switch. Installing the case is a piece of cake, although it takes some muscle to take it back off.

Once the case is on your iPhone 5, you can rest assured that whatever you put into the wallet "drawer" is going to stay put. It makes an audible "click" when shut, and requires a bit of pressure to open. I can verify that two credit cards and a driver's license fit into the case snugly, but I had no cash with which to check out the "one folded bill" claim...

If there's one negative I can find with the Commuter Series Wallet, it's that it's somewhat difficult to get cards out -- a small ramp on the bottom edge of the drawer would have made it a bit easier to slide cards out. As it is, you have to kind of pick them out with your fingers.

The Commuter Series Wallet is available now from OtterBox in black and glacier (white hard shell with gray silicone), and will soon be available in primrose (pinkish hard shell with light gray silicone). The case weighs just 2.0 ounces (56.7 grams), not bad considering the level of protection it provides. Unsurprisingly, it's a little thick at .71 inches (1.8 cm), but when you consider that the case can eliminate the need to carry a separate wallet, that's not a real issue.

Check out the video below for a demonstration of the Commuter Series Wallet Case, and then read on for a chance to win one of these cases.

Conclusion

With the Commuter Series Wallet for iPhone 5/5s, OtterBox has entered the case wallet market with a bang. The case provides the excellent drop protection that the company's line is known for, and provides a convenient and secure way to carry an ID card and some credit cards.

Pros

  • Reasonably priced for a high-quality protective product
  • Very lightweight
  • Positive feedback on the drawer mechanism insures that your cards remain safely stowed
  • Excellent build quality
Cons

    It would be nice if the cards could just slide out with pressure from a thumb; as it is, they must be picked out of the drawer one by one.
Who is it for?

    The iPhone 5/5s owner who is looking both for the protection of one of OtterBox's Commuter Series cases and the convenience of not having to carry a separate wallet

Giveaway

Here are the rules for the giveaway:

  • Open to legal US residents of the 50 United States, the District of Columbia and Canada (excluding Quebec) who are 18 and older.
  • To enter, fill out the form below completely and click or tap the Submit button.
  • The entry must be made before October 8, 2013 11:59PM Eastern Daylight Time.
  • You may enter only once.
  • One winner will be selected and will receive an OtterBox Commuter Series Wallet valued at $44.95
  • Click Here for complete Official Rules.

Source: Tuaw
Monday, October 14, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

Greater Manchester firefighters given specialist training to rescue obese people

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The specialist search and rescue unit will learn how to move or release overweight members of the public following a rise in calls

A new team of firefighters is being trained to rescue obese people.

The specialist search and rescue unit will learn how to move or release overweight members of the public following a rise in calls.

The unit will also be trained to deal with a range of other complex and challenging emergencies, including collapsed buildings.

Figures reveal a rise in incidents where firefighters are called by paramedics to help lift, move or release obese men and women - which are classed as 'bariatric rescues'.

There were 23 bariatric rescues in 2011, up from 22 in 2010 and 19 in 2009 - and fire service bosses say 5s iphone cases rescue animals now continue to increase.

The new Technical Response Unit (TRU) is made up of 54 firefighters, with an on-call team available for national and international incidents.

Intensive training in specialist skills has started, including techniques used to free or move obese people. Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service said the unit would provide a 'specialist response' across Greater Manchester while still being available for day-to-day emergencies including fires and road traffic collisions.

Warren Pickstone, the fire service's head of resilience and planning, said bariatric rescues were increasing in line with national obesity levels.

NHS figures suggest 24 per cent of men and 26 per cent of women are now classed as obese.

The figures represent a sharp rise as in 1993, just 13 per cent of men and 16 per cent of women were classed as clinically overweight.

Mr Pickstone said: "Bariatric rescues can be complex and difficult and they must be done with sensitivity. It can be hard to move a person who is large and we have to use certain techniques

"Sometimes we have to support staircases to take additional weight and they can be time consuming, but so can other types of rescue.

"The training is not just for bariatric rescues. It can be for a host of other incidents. The skills the firefighters have will enable them to be adaptable.

"The bariatric rescues are low compared to other technical incidents that we attend."

Bosses said the brigade was dealing with more specialist incidents - like bariatric rescues, terrorist threats, rescues from height, collapsed buildings, body recoveries and trench rescues - than ever before.

Group manager Jim Hutton, who is leading the project, said: "The TRU will ensure we're giving the best possible protection to our firefighters and the people of Greater Manchester."

Two specialist vehicles will be manned from the team based at Ashton and Leigh fire stations.

Mr Hutton added: "The locations provide wide geographical cover with the ability to reach any part of the county within 25 minutes.

"This capability will be implemented with minimum cost - proving a greater service and increased public value."

The figures for bariatric rescues - revealed in the M.E.N. after a request under the Freedom of Information Act, showed more took place in Wigan than in any other area of Greater Manchester, followed by north Manchester, Tameside, Oldham and Rochdale.

During 2011-12, there were 11,736 hospital admissions due to obesity - a marked increase over the past 10 years.

And in June, it was reported that doctors in England and Wales have seen a four-fold increase in the number of children and teenagers admitted to hospital for conditions linked to obesity.

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Source: Manchestereveningnews
Saturday, October 12, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein

iPhone 5s Bending In People's Pockets | Cult of Mac

5s iphone cases otterbox defender layers-plie-tordu1-640x215.jpg">

Back when the iPhone 5 first came out, there were a surprising number of reports of people whose iPhones suddenly bent themselves. This did not seem to be an issue with accidental damage en masse: most of the people who reported the issue noted that their iPhones bent back at the volume button, and hadn't been kept in a back pocket or sat on.

It seems with the iPhone 5s, this mysterious predilection towards bending has returned.

Over at French site Nowherelse.fr, our good friend Steve Hemmerstoffer points out that bent iPhone 5s devices already seem to be popping up. And boy, are they bent.

On one hand, you'd expect for the iPhone 5s - which shares the same chassis as the iPhone 5 - to have the same structural issues as its predecessor. But this is a big structural fault to leave unfixed between two generations. Even if you do keep your iPhone in your back pocket and sit on it regularly, an iPhone made out of metal and glass folding in on itself like a bent boner is an engineering issue.

Has your iPhone 5s bent in your pocket since you purchased it? Let us know in the comments.

John Brownlee is a Contributing Editor. He has also written for Wired, Playboy, Boing Boing, Popular Mechanics, VentureBeat, and Gizmodo. He lives in Boston with his girlfriend and two parakeets. You can follow him here on Twitter.

(sorry, you need Javascript to see this e-mail address)| Read more posts by John Brownlee.


Source: Cultofmac
Tuesday, October 8, 2013
Posted by Adam Edelstein
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